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type-lover:

The Hungarian Guggenheim
by Krisztián Lakosi & Lakosi Richárd

On paying to consume product placements

In a traditional newspaper or network TV business model, advertising revenues pays for most of the contents’ costs, to the point that when delievered to the consumer, it is free or sold at next to nothing. After all, chump change for a newspaper doesn’t adequately cover the costs of compliling all the reports of the day in it.

It’s a model that is struggling to survive in this digital day and age, when ad money has many many competing media modes to choose from, including online. It’s also a model that does not apply at all to product placement.

Product placements—the act of embedding logos, products and other marketing vehicles into a scene that is not an advertisement in itself—is a growing practice in Hollywood movies and in video games. Racing around a futuristic racetrack and encountering a couple specific logos plastered throughout the course, or seeing an actor consume a particular drink and walk around in a particular shoe brand throughout the film, to the average idiot, these instances of brands appearances seem incidental to the overall production. Which is really the whole point to the concept of product placement. Really and increasingly so, these brands were specially placed there, and companies are paying big bucks to associate themselves with a blockbuster flick or hit game.

Come to think of it, you are paying to be advertised to. You are paying to consume all these subliminal ads in your entertainment. To add injury to insult, product placements does not make anything more affordable. A hit video game choked full of embedded brands costs as much as one that lacks any. Cinemas are expensive to attend, and product placements does not make a movie ticket cheaper—it just subsidizes the ridiculous budget of a blockbuster. What the hell?!

Then again, maybe it’s not that much different from other and older forms of encountered advertising. You go to see a ball game for example, and in addition to seeing your favourite team win before you, you are also entering an environment that is full of logos and official-sponsor-of-this-and-that. The cost of a game ticket, much like a movie ticket, have far exceeded the rate of inflation, and the exponential rise of environmental advertising impressions certainly don’t seem like they are having an effect at all on your ticket.

But that’s just what this culture and society has become.

Brazil was not meant to achieve glory on home soil.
That’s all, folks!

Brazil was not meant to achieve glory on home soil.
That’s all, folks!

wandrlust:

Brasilia, 1961-63 — Lucien Clergue

ryanpanos:

Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall | ICD/ITKE/IIGS University of Stuttgart | Via

The Landesgartenschau Exhibition Hall is an architectural prototype building and a showcase for the current developments in computational design and robotic fabrication for lightweight timber construction. Funded by the European Union and the state of Baden‐Württemberg, the building is the first to have its primary structure entirely made of robotically prefabricated beech plywood plates. The newly developed timber construction offers not only innovative architectural possibilities; it is also highly resource efficient, with the load bearing plate structure being just 50mm thin. This is made possible through integrative computational design, simulation, fabrication and surveying methods.

cantwaitforpizza:

i can’t stop laughing he’s like what no climb

(via onlylolgifs)

(via fuckyeahuncharted)

Watching Shaolin Soccer and a live Blitzkrieg at the same time. The movie should be mandatory viewing for all Brazilian footballers.

Watching Shaolin Soccer and a live Blitzkrieg at the same time. The movie should be mandatory viewing for all Brazilian footballers.

type-lover:

Coasters, Drink & Drunk
by Tun Ho

because you got nothing better to do while you wait for the end of the world.

because you got nothing better to do while you wait for the end of the world.

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